About the gallery

Flowers Gallery represents more than 50 international artists and artist’s estates, working with a wide range of media. Over the...

Flowers Gallery represents more than 50 international artists and artist’s estates, working with a wide range of media. Over the past five decades the gallery has presented over 900 exhibitions across its global locations, also supporting the production of artist’s publications and the presentation of works by gallery artists in art fairs, public galleries, museums and institutions around the world.

The gallery programme includes major annual summer survey shows and renowned recurring exhibitions such as Artist of the Day and Small is Beautiful, which have formed an important high-profile platform for many emerging and under-recognised contemporary artists.

50 YEARS

On February 10, 1970 Angela Flowers (b 1932) opened her first eponymous gallery space in London on Lisle Street, above the Artists International Association (AIA), a cooperative of artists who offered the space to her rent-free in exchange for commission. The gallery stayed there for just over a year and a half, with Tom Phillips, Derek Hirst, Jeff Nuttall, Penelope Slinger, Ian Breakwell, Patrick Hughes, Jeanne Masoero and Nancy Fouts amongst the first artists shown in the space. The initial exhibitions included Postcard Show, for which Angela commissioned original works of art to be made into postcards by artists including Joseph Beuys, David Hockney, Richard Hamilton and Peter Blake. Michael White, the theatre impresario, and the financial writer Robert Heller became the first non-executive directors of the gallery in 1971.

Angela Flowers in the Lisle Street gallery, 1970. Photo: Adrian Flowers
The gallery moved to Portland Mews, Soho in 1971, opening with a group exhibition that September. It was subsidised by...
Angela Flowers outside Portland Mews, 1972

The gallery moved to Portland Mews, Soho in 1971, opening with a group exhibition that September. It was subsidised by renting the former basement stables to barrow boys who worked at nearby Berwick Street market. 

Between the two spaces in the early 70s artists exhibited included David Hepher, Arakawa, Ray Johnson, Boyd and Evans, Wendy...
Arakawa, 1971 at his exhibition in Portland Mews. Photo: Adrian Flowers

Between the two spaces in the early 70s artists exhibited included David Hepher, Arakawa, Ray Johnson, Boyd and Evans, Wendy Taylor, Glenys Barton, Anthony Earnshaw, Deanna Petherbridge, Carole Hodgson and Derek Boshier. Works were regularly placed in the collections of Tate, the British Council,the Arts Council and overseas including the Ludwig Museum, Germany, and the Museum of Modern Art, NY. The gallery started participating at international contemporary art fairs, first exhibiting at Basel in 1971. In 1972 the gallery staged British Drawings 1952-1972, establishing a recurring commitment to significant survey and group exhibitions. In 1974 the gallery began its annual exhibition Small is Beautiful, which is ongoing.

In 1978 the space was sold and nine months later the gallery moved below and then next door to Annely...
Selection of Badge Art

In 1978 the space was sold and nine months later the gallery moved below and then next door to Annely Juda in Tottenham Mews, where it remained for ten years. Artists exhibiting at the gallery during this period included Steve Barraclough, Ana Godel, Micheal Farrell, Amanda Faulkner, Michael Rothenstein, John Keane, Nicola Hicks, Friedemann Hahn, Terry Frost and Peter Howson. It was also the venue that saw the inception of Artist of the Day, a series of one day only exhibitions which is still produced. Innovative group exhibitions continued, including Nudes, Badge ArtPortraits by the Masters of Hollywood Photography and 80 Prints by Modern Masters, which led to the inauguration of the highly popular Print of the Month Club.

Angela began staging seasonal exhibitions out of her longtime home in Rosscarbery, West Cork, Ireland in 1985, with the first...
Nicola Hicks, Crouching Minotaur, Rosscarbery, August 1994. Photo Steve Ibb

Angela began staging seasonal exhibitions out of her longtime home in Rosscarbery, West Cork, Ireland in 1985, with the first show of William Crozier's work. The summer programme at Rosscarbery ran nearly every summer for 15 years, with occasional exhibitions still produced. 

Alongside a career in music, Angela's son, Matthew Flowers, worked on and off for the gallery from 1970 until 1983...
Richmond Road, 1988

Alongside a career in music, Angela's son, Matthew Flowers, worked on and off for the gallery from 1970 until 1983 when he moved to the business full time. He has remained since, becoming its Managing Director in 1989. 

In 1988 the gallery added an East End venue, Flowers East, on Richmond Road off Mare Street, in the heart...
Artist's Choice, Richmond Road, late 1990s

In 1988 the gallery added an East End venue, Flowers East, on Richmond Road off Mare Street, in the heart of Hackney, with a 4,500 square foot industrial building that was previously a furrier and a private laundry. At the time it was the largest commercial gallery space in London. The first exhibition, Contemporary Portraits, included Lucian Freud, Eduardo Paolozzi, Leon Kossof, Frank Auerbach and Tony Bevan, alongside gallery artists such as John Kirby and Tai Shan Schierenberg. The gallery expanded further in 1991, taking an 18,000 square foot building across the road in a former leather factory. The two vast exhibition spaces allowed the opportunity to put on large, acclaimed shows including, British Abstract Art - Part 1, Painting, co-curated with Bryan Robertson with works by many of the leading living abstract painters including Patrick Heron, Bridget Riley, Tess Jaray, Sean Scully, Michael Kidner, Robyn Denny and John Hoyland. This was followed by a Part 2, Sculpture that included Anish Kapoor, Alison Wilding and Richard Deacon.

In the mid-1990s a temporary small gallery was opened in Silver Place, Soho, to maintain links to the West End. In the 90s two gallery artists were commissioned by the Imperial War Museum to document the era's wars - John Keane (Persian Gulf) and Peter Howson (Bosnia). 

In 1998 after exhibiting at US fairs for many years including Art Chicago from 1987 and Miami and LA Art...
Flowers West, Santa Monica, 2000

In 1998 after exhibiting at US fairs for many years including Art Chicago from 1987 and Miami and LA Art Fairs from 1989, the gallery opened in Los Angeles at Santa Monica's Bergamot Station Arts Center. Its US operations moved to New York in 2003, initially uptown on Madison Avenue, and then in 2009 to Chelsea where it remained for 10 years.

In 2000 the gallery opened on Cork Street, Mayfair, and in 2002 it moved from Hackney to Kingsland Road, Shoreditch,...
Peter Howson, Cork Street, 2013. Photo: Antonio Parente

In 2000 the gallery opened on Cork Street, Mayfair, and in 2002 it moved from Hackney to Kingsland Road, Shoreditch, to 12,000 square feet spread over three floors of a 19th century warehouse. The early 2000's saw the gallery take on the Scottish artist Ken Currie and further growth of the photography programme, working with artists including Edward Burtynsky, Robert Polidori, Mona Kuhn, Nadav Kander, Julie Cockburn and Shen Wei.

After several years of running an office and exhibiting at fairs in Asia, the gallery opened a space in central...
Hong Kong, 2020

After several years of running an office and exhibiting at fairs in Asia, the gallery opened a space in central Hong Kong in 2020, the year the gallery celebrated its 50th Anniversary with 50 x 50 and 50 Years, exhibitions in its two London galleries showcasing the breadth of the artists and programming developed over the last five decades. 

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